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placenta seeds

Caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase

Accumulation of Capsaicin in Seed, Pericarp and Placenta of Capsicum annuum L Fruit

  • Varindra Pandhair
  • S. Sharma

Abstract

The accumulation of capsaicin in different parts of fruit viz, placenta, pericarp and seeds of Capsicum annuum L cv Punjab Lal was compared with the activities of first four enzymes of capsaicin biosynthetic pathway at various physiological stages. Capsaicin accumulation (mg g −1 DW) was about ten fold higher in placenta (63.96), than in pericarp (7.12) and seeds (5.06) in ripe fruits. Capsaicin accumulation was 5.79 mg g −1 DW at 28 DAF in whole fruit. The specific activity of PAL was also ten times higher in placenta, whereas the specific activities of Ca4H, Ca3H and CaOMT were about two times higher in placenta than in other parts of fruit. The trend CaOMT > PAL > Ca4H > Ca3H was observed with peak activity at 28 DAF for Ca3H and CaOMT and at 35 DAF for PAL and Ca4H in placenta. These four enzymes showed low activity during the period up to 21 DAF, and peak activities for these enzymes were obtatined at the time of maximum growth of fruit in length and thereafter.

Key words

Abbreviations

Days after flowering

Phenylalanine ammonia lyase

Caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase

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Placenta, plural Placentas, orPlacentae, in botany, the surface of the carpel (highly modified leaf) to which the ovules (potential seeds) are attached. The placenta is usually located in a region corresponding somewhat to the margins of a leaf but is actually submarginal in position. The placentation, or arrangement of ovules within the ovary, is frequently of taxonomic value. Placentation is usually submarginal in a simple pistil (female sex organ). In a compound pistil, two or more carpels are used in various ways, placentation being parietal, with carpels united by their adjacent margins and the ovules disposed along the inner ovary walls; axile, with carpels folded inward and the ovules along the central axis of the ovary; free central, derived from the axile, with a central column bearing the ovules; basal, with ovules positioned on a low column at the base of the ovary; or laminar, with ovules scattered over the inner surfaces of carpels.

Placenta

Placenta, plural Placentas, orPlacentae, in botany, the surface of the carpel (highly modified leaf) to which the ovules (potential seeds) are attached. The placenta is usually located in a region corresponding somewhat to the margins of a leaf but is actually submarginal in position. The placentation, or arrangement of ovules within the ovary, is frequently of taxonomic value. Placentation is usually submarginal in a simple pistil (female sex organ). In a compound pistil, two or more carpels are used in various ways, placentation being parietal, with carpels united by their adjacent margins and the ovules disposed along the inner ovary walls; axile, with carpels folded inward and the ovules along the central axis of the ovary; free central, derived from the axile, with a central column bearing the ovules; basal, with ovules positioned on a low column at the base of the ovary; or laminar, with ovules scattered over the inner surfaces of carpels.