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Pinot Noir grows long and lanky, reaching 6-7 feet at finish. outdoors, this plant has been grown as tall as 15 feet, with per-plant yields averaging in multiple pounds. The growth pattern of the Pinot Noir is more like a spider plant than a typical tree structure, getting wider than it is tall and forming bottom branches very low on the plant. Its abundant arms form many colas with close nodes. As such, Pinot Noir is best as a multi-branch plant in soil and works well in a screen of green setup. Because of its bendable, vine-like branching, this strain can be trained to a lattice or grown as a low-profile plant that blends with the surrounding scenery. It is also ideal for raised beds or container gardening. In most indoor gardening scenarios, it doesn’t hurt to stake this plant’s pliable branches to create a more orderly canopy, but the branches are sturdy enough to stand on their own.

Oregon Pinot Noir

Stoney Girl Gardens

Sativa 80 / Indica 20
Origins: Hawaiian Purple Kush x Pit Bull
Flowering: 38-45 days

This variety was bred among the grapes of one of the most respected Pinot Noir vineyards in Oregon. It gets its name from where it was bred as well as the purple color of its stems and buds and the sophisticated grape aspect of its flavor. Vine-like and tropical, this plant is well suited for outdoor grows in the Pacific Northwest or similar climates – that is, moderate with plenty of rain.

Indoors, the Oregon Pinot Noir is amazingly versatile. The mother is a Purple Kush from the Hawaiian Islands. This mother was truly a traditional girl, bred from 1972 Panama Red and Columbian Gold parents. She was brought from Hawaii to Oregon and then crossed with Stoney Girl Gardens’ Pit Bull. The Pit Bull genetics reduced time to harvest and also helped the plant acclimate to its cooler home off the island. As a result, this durable cross can finish in a quick 6 weeks of blooming, remarkably fast for a strain that is sativa-dominant in effects.

Pinot Noir grows long and lanky, reaching 6-7 feet at finish. outdoors, this plant has been grown as tall as 15 feet, with per-plant yields averaging in multiple pounds. The growth pattern of the Pinot Noir is more like a spider plant than a typical tree structure, getting wider than it is tall and forming bottom branches very low on the plant. Its abundant arms form many colas with close nodes. As such, Pinot Noir is best as a multi-branch plant in soil and works well in a screen of green setup. Because of its bendable, vine-like branching, this strain can be trained to a lattice or grown as a low-profile plant that blends with the surrounding scenery. It is also ideal for raised beds or container gardening. In most indoor gardening scenarios, it doesn’t hurt to stake this plant’s pliable branches to create a more orderly canopy, but the branches are sturdy enough to stand on their own.

Gardeners who take pleasure in color variation will enjoy this plant’s purple tones. The stems tint to a faint purple that deepens as the plant ages. The bright tones of the thin sativa leaves fade to purple. The Pinot Noir buds are bright and long, with wispy-haired pistils that are typical of Hawaiian strain. They start as little white fluffs that develop into dense, purple golf balls forming chains up the stem. Plants can easily produce 4-5 ounces per plant in an indoor grow with good methods.

Oregon Pinot Noir tastes like sweet grape with an edge of haze. it has retained delicious tropical qualities, adding notes of melon, nuts, candy, and earthy honey. Although sativa-dominant, this strain has a noticeable body effect, which can enhance pleasures and even serve as an aphrodisiac, but may trigger couchlock or cause mental wandering at larger doses.Overall it is a lingering mellow eyedroop high best saved for an evening smoke since its stonier, sleepier side may turn wake-and-bake into naptime or interfere with the day’s motivations.

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Description: Probably the best known of all the grape, namely from it notoriety from wine-making. The dense clusters of Deep Purple to Dark Red grape used commonly in winemaking. The name may also refer to wines produced predominantly from pinot noir grapes. Pinot noir grapes are grown in diverse locations around the world, but the grape is chiefly associated with the Burgundy region of France. Production of pinot noir dates back more than two thousand years.
Heirloom: Yes
Container: Yes
Life Cycle: Perennial
Pollination Requirement: Self fertile
Diameter Spread: Vining, Spreading
Form: N/A
Height: N/A
Flowers: Small, inconspicuous, short lasting
Flower Color: White to Blue
Flower Period: 6 to 8 weeks after first leaf growth. Depending on planting time, location, and conditions
Foliage: Medium to large leaves, compound edges, used in dolmades, and other recipes
Foliage Color: Green
Fruit: Large and dense
Fruit Color: Deep red to Dark Blue-Purple
Fruit Cones: Very large, dense clustered fruits, growing from vine
Growth Habit: Perennial, vining plant, may be trellised, grown in rows, or mounding in natural form
Other Names: European Grapevine
Origin Notes: Private Grower, PA, USA
Wildlife/Landscape Value: The grapes provide an important food source for a variety of wild animals, especially birds, and the foliage provides thick cover.
Home Uses: Grapes may be harvested for fresh fruit, for addition to cooking, or may be used for grape juices, wines, and other home uses. Grape seed is a wonderful source for many antioxidants, and other trace minerals.
Germination: Surface sow, cover lightly with loose soil, water with spray bottle, keep in warm, sunny location, may be transplanted when 2 or more inches of growth are present. May also be sown directly, if protected from predators, and sufficient water is provided.
Maintenance: Medium, pruning, wiring, and other maintenance required, if desired.
Pests/Diseases: Rot, Scorch, & Spot – if present in growing area
Cultural Requirements: Fertile soils, well-draining, and loamy are best, however, will grow in other soils. You may amend and adjust soils to preferred or desired requirements with little interference to growth and development of the grape plant
USDA Zones: N/A
Spacing: Grower Dependent
Sun: Full for best results, dappled or filtered shade, once established
Water: Water as needed, support with additional water throughout the growing season. Do not water during winter months
Foliage Texture: Medium to coarse

Organic Pinot Noir Grape Seeds – 20 Seeds – Most commonly used in home wine making, beautiful color and amazing taste. All USDA Zones

Item details

20 Organic Pinot Noir Grape Seeds

Organic Pinot Noir Grape Seeds
Vitis vinifera

Description: Probably the best known of all the grape, namely from it notoriety from wine-making. The dense clusters of Deep Purple to Dark Red grape used commonly in winemaking. The name may also refer to wines produced predominantly from pinot noir grapes. Pinot noir grapes are grown in diverse locations around the world, but the grape is chiefly associated with the Burgundy region of France. Production of pinot noir dates back more than two thousand years.
Heirloom: Yes
Container: Yes
Life Cycle: Perennial
Pollination Requirement: Self fertile
Diameter Spread: Vining, Spreading
Form: N/A
Height: N/A
Flowers: Small, inconspicuous, short lasting
Flower Color: White to Blue
Flower Period: 6 to 8 weeks after first leaf growth. Depending on planting time, location, and conditions
Foliage: Medium to large leaves, compound edges, used in dolmades, and other recipes
Foliage Color: Green
Fruit: Large and dense
Fruit Color: Deep red to Dark Blue-Purple
Fruit Cones: Very large, dense clustered fruits, growing from vine
Growth Habit: Perennial, vining plant, may be trellised, grown in rows, or mounding in natural form
Other Names: European Grapevine
Origin Notes: Private Grower, PA, USA
Wildlife/Landscape Value: The grapes provide an important food source for a variety of wild animals, especially birds, and the foliage provides thick cover.
Home Uses: Grapes may be harvested for fresh fruit, for addition to cooking, or may be used for grape juices, wines, and other home uses. Grape seed is a wonderful source for many antioxidants, and other trace minerals.
Germination: Surface sow, cover lightly with loose soil, water with spray bottle, keep in warm, sunny location, may be transplanted when 2 or more inches of growth are present. May also be sown directly, if protected from predators, and sufficient water is provided.
Maintenance: Medium, pruning, wiring, and other maintenance required, if desired.
Pests/Diseases: Rot, Scorch, & Spot – if present in growing area
Cultural Requirements: Fertile soils, well-draining, and loamy are best, however, will grow in other soils. You may amend and adjust soils to preferred or desired requirements with little interference to growth and development of the grape plant
USDA Zones: N/A
Spacing: Grower Dependent
Sun: Full for best results, dappled or filtered shade, once established
Water: Water as needed, support with additional water throughout the growing season. Do not water during winter months
Foliage Texture: Medium to coarse

Organic Pinot Noir Grape Seeds
Vitis vinifera

Description: Probably the best known of all the grape, namely from it notoriety from wine-making. The dense clusters of Deep Purple to Dark Red grape used commonly in winemaking. The name may also refer to wines produced predominantly from pinot noir grapes. Pinot noir grapes are grown in diverse locations around the world, but the grape is chiefly associated with the Burgundy region of France. Production of pinot noir dates back more than two thousand years.
Heirloom: Yes
Container: Yes
Life Cycle: Perennial
Pollination Requirement: Self fertile
Diameter Spread: Vining, Spreading
Form: N/A
Height: N/A
Flowers: Small, inconspicuous, short lasting
Flower Color: White to Blue
Flower Period: 6 to 8 weeks after first leaf growth. Depending on planting time, location, and conditions
Foliage: Medium to large leaves, compound edges, used in dolmades, and other recipes
Foliage Color: Green
Fruit: Large and dense
Fruit Color: Deep red to Dark Blue-Purple
Fruit Cones: Very large, dense clustered fruits, growing from vine
Growth Habit: Perennial, vining plant, may be trellised, grown in rows, or mounding in natural form
Other Names: European Grapevine
Origin Notes: Private Grower, PA, USA
Wildlife/Landscape Value: The grapes provide an important food source for a variety of wild animals, especially birds, and the foliage provides thick cover.
Home Uses: Grapes may be harvested for fresh fruit, for addition to cooking, or may be used for grape juices, wines, and other home uses. Grape seed is a wonderful source for many antioxidants, and other trace minerals.
Germination: Surface sow, cover lightly with loose soil, water with spray bottle, keep in warm, sunny location, may be transplanted when 2 or more inches of growth are present. May also be sown directly, if protected from predators, and sufficient water is provided.
Maintenance: Medium, pruning, wiring, and other maintenance required, if desired.
Pests/Diseases: Rot, Scorch, & Spot – if present in growing area
Cultural Requirements: Fertile soils, well-draining, and loamy are best, however, will grow in other soils. You may amend and adjust soils to preferred or desired requirements with little interference to growth and development of the grape plant
USDA Zones: N/A
Spacing: Grower Dependent
Sun: Full for best results, dappled or filtered shade, once established
Water: Water as needed, support with additional water throughout the growing season. Do not water during winter months
Foliage Texture: Medium to coarse