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medical flower seeds

Medical flower seeds
Feverfew plant is a traditional medicinal herb and occasionally grown for ornament. Tanacetum parthenium most commonly used in migraine and common headaches.

15 Beautiful Flowering Plants With Medicinal Uses

In the Morden age of herbal medicine, one of the main ingredients for their medicines are plants, flowers, seeds or root. Here is the list of flowering plants used in herbalism or in herbal medicine to treat human diseases.

Marigold

Tagetes or marigold plant has been used for immune response, stomach pain and other medicinal purposes. The marigold flowers are used in garlands, decoration for weddings, festivals and religious events in India.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus are ornamental plants and hibiscus flowers are used to make herbal tea around the world. The health benefits of hibiscus tea boost digestive and immune system.

Sunflower

Sunflower seeds are a great source of vitamins, phosphorus, magnesium and other minerals. They also supports digestion, controls high blood pressure and healthy skin.

Lavender

Lavender have been used as ornamental plants for garden and landscape. The flower buds are used as species in cooking and its oil is used to treat heal burns and wounds.

Echinacea

Echinacea flowering plants from daisy family and supposed medicinal qualities. Echinacea tea boosts the immune system, supports oral health and good source of antioxidants like vitamin C.

Chamomile

Chamomile are commonly used to make herb with medicinal uses. The beautiful Chamomile and flower tea are best for skin care, runny nose and sore throat.

Yarrow

Yarrow flowering plant has historical use in traditional medicine, to treat headaches and battle wounds. Achillea millefolium or common yarrow is native to Asia and Europe.

Cornflower

Cornflower used as one of the main ingredient in tea blends and herbal teas. The Centaurea cyanus treat fever, Constipation and liver disorders.

Peganum Harmala

Peganum Harmala is a medicinal plants and has antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. The seeds are good for skin care, toothache and will reduce stomachache.

Passion Flower

Passion Flower, root and fresh or dried leaves are used only for short term medicinal purposes. The powerful presence of antioxidant compounds are help to reduce high blood pressure and depression.

Marsh Mallow

The leaves, flowers and the root of Althaea officinalis are used for traditional herbal medicine. Marsh mallow traditionally used for irritation relief, mouth ulcers and stomach ailments.

Feverfew

Feverfew plant is a traditional medicinal herb and occasionally grown for ornament. Tanacetum parthenium most commonly used in migraine and common headaches.

Indian Lotus

Indian Lotus is a aquatic plant and the national flower of India. All parts of lotus flower are edible and its flowers, leaves and seeds have been used in Ayurveda for diarrhea, cholera and fever.

Night Flowering Jasmine

Night Flowering Jasmine also known as parijat has been used for medicinal purposes in Ayurveda. Parijata leaves are used for treatment of knee pain and to treats sore throat.

Milk Thistle

Silybum marianum have been known to be used as food and also used to treat liver problems and treatment of cancer. The flowering plant is native of Europe and Asia, also used as a decorative element in gardens.

Liniment: A liniment is a topical solution applied to the skin. How to make a liniment: You will need a clean glass jar with lid, a pint size canning jar works fine, a cup of chopped fresh herbs from your garden or ¼ cup of dried herbs ( we recommend our tincture packs ) 1/2 pint of grain alcohol ( such as Everclear ) and 1/2 pint of distilled water.
Place the herb material into the jar and fill jar with equal parts grain alcohol and distilled water. Close lid tightly and label the jar with the ingredients and the date.
Store the jar in a dark, dry and cool place. Every 2 days, shake the jar vigorously.
After four to six weeks, strain the mixture through a screen or colander, catching the liquid in bowl, then take the herbs and wrap in a towel or pillowcase and squeeze as much liquid as possible from herbs, catching this liquid in the bowl as well.
The Strained liquid is your finished liniment. We recommend storing liniments in four ounce amber glass bottles. Be sure to label bottles correctly!

Medical flower seeds

Important Note: Most of the seeds on this page will benefit greatly from using the CAPE Smoke Seed Germination Primer that we use in our own greenhouses. We find we receive significantly better germination results when we use this primer on these types of seeds.

Featuring unusual folk medicine plant seeds for Universities, Research Facilities, Herbalists and Gardeners.

Our seeds are fresh and ready for delivery.

The information listed with the seeds is for general information only and does not reflect any recommendations on the part of this business. Before using any medicinal plant, we strongly recommend you first consult a physician. Our information is based on published works dealing with herb plants, not medical publications. We shall in no way be held responsible for the actions of anyone using our seeds. Our sole responsibility/liability will be to replace seeds that do not germinate. We shall in no way be liable for the use/misuse of these seeds.

Herb: Any plant used for making medicine, seasoning or scents.

Infusion: A tea made by pouring boiling water over the plant or parts of the plant. The most common method of preparing an infusion is to place herbs in a heat tolerant container that has a lid, and pour boiling water over the herbs ( a normal rule of thumb is to use a cup of green herbs per cup of boiling water applied, or a handful of dry herbs per cup of boiling water applied ). Cover the container and allow the herbs to steep in covered container for about 15 minutes. Your infusion is now ready to enjoy!

Decoction: A drink made by boiling the plant or parts of the plant in water and then straining. As a rule of thumb, place the herbs in water that has been brought to a boil, then reduce heat until the water is gently simmering. Simmer for about 15 minutes, then strain. The liquid is the decoction. Honey or an aromatic herb is usually added to improve the taste.

Aromatic. This refers to herbs that have a pleasant smell or taste. They are often used for potpourri or for adding to other herbs to improve the taste of a decoction. One part aromatic to three parts medicinal herb is usually sufficient.

Demulcent: An herb that possesses soothing, mucilaginous qualities which help to relieve any internal irritation such as arrowroot, coltsfoot, comfrey, sassafras pith, and slippery elm.

Liniment: A liniment is a topical solution applied to the skin. How to make a liniment: You will need a clean glass jar with lid, a pint size canning jar works fine, a cup of chopped fresh herbs from your garden or ¼ cup of dried herbs ( we recommend our tincture packs ) 1/2 pint of grain alcohol ( such as Everclear ) and 1/2 pint of distilled water.
Place the herb material into the jar and fill jar with equal parts grain alcohol and distilled water. Close lid tightly and label the jar with the ingredients and the date.
Store the jar in a dark, dry and cool place. Every 2 days, shake the jar vigorously.
After four to six weeks, strain the mixture through a screen or colander, catching the liquid in bowl, then take the herbs and wrap in a towel or pillowcase and squeeze as much liquid as possible from herbs, catching this liquid in the bowl as well.
The Strained liquid is your finished liniment. We recommend storing liniments in four ounce amber glass bottles. Be sure to label bottles correctly!

Herbal Lozenges: Herbal lozenges are a wonderful way to soothe a sore throat or relieve cold and flu conditions.
How to make Herbal Lozenges: You will need about 4 ounces of your favorite herbal decoction, we recommend Blue Vervain, Echinacea or Sage.
Pour decoction into a bowl and add powdered Marsh Mallow root until you have a thick, paste like solution. Add 3-4 drops of peppermint essential oil to mix.
Make small lozenges by pinching small amounts of the mix between your fingers and shaping to size. Place lozenges on wax paper and allow to dry for a few hours, then store in covered container in refrigerator.
Lozenges should keep in the fridge for several weeks.
Suck on a lozenge whenever you have a sore throat.

Tincture: A preparation made by soaking an herb in alcohol until the alcohol absorbs the beneficial ingredients of the plant. This process is known as maceration.
How to make a tincture: You will need a clean glass jar with lid, a pint size canning jar works fine, a cup of chopped fresh herbs from your garden or ¼ cup of dried herbs ( we recommend our tincture packs ) and 1 pint of vodka. The vodka is usually about 80-85 proof, do not use 100 proof vodka.
Place the herb material into the jar and fill jar with vodka. Close lid tightly and label the jar with the ingredients and the date.
Store the jar in a dark, dry and cool place. Every 2 days, shake the jar vigorously.
After four to six weeks, strain the mixture through a screen or colander, catching the liquid in bowl, then take the herbs and wrap in a towel or pillowcase and squeeze as much liquid as possible from herbs, catching this liquid in the bowl as well.
The Strained liquid is your finished tincture. We recommend storing tinctures in four ounce amber glass bottles, and keeping smaller one ounce amber glass bottles with droppers in your medicine cabinet, re-filling the smaller bottles as needed. Be sure to label bottles correctly!

Tinctures made from at least 25% alcohol ( 80 proof vodka is 40% ) can be stored indefinitely, tinctures you do not use can be passed on to your children and grandchildren.

Compresses and Poultices: A compress is basically a cloth soaked in herbal decoction or infusion that is applied to painful areas. Use Comfrey for sports type injuries, Plantain for insect bits and bee stings, St. John’s Wort and Rosemary for pain relief and Chamomile for cramp relief. A poultice is made by placing a cup of the chosen herb in a heat tolerant bowl, pouring boiling water over the herbs and allowing to steep until the herbs have cooled enough to be tolerated by the skin.
Place a clean cotton cloth over the infected area, then place the warm/semi hot herbs on top of the cloth and cover with another piece of cotton cloth. Keep the poultice in place until the herbs have cooled down completely. Discard the herbs and wash the poultice cloths before reusing. Best results are obtained when poultices are applied 3 times a day.

Suppositories and Boluses
You can make a natural suppository using powdered herbs and cocoa butter. To make a suppository should warm cocoa butter to a liquid state in a double boiler and stir in the powdered herbs as it cools. When it is mixed well put into the refrigerator to harden. Roll this out to be about 3/4 of an inch thick. Cut into 3/4 of an inch strips. These are used in the rectum and the vagina to treat infections and irritations. They can also be used for tumors in these areas.
Generally the herbs used in suppositories are astringents such as white oak bark or bayberry bark; and demulcent healing herbs like comfrey root or slippery elm; and antibiotic herbs like garlic and Goldenseal. Goldenseal is really a great one for this as it combines astringent, tissue healing, and antibiotic qualities all in one.
Do not use more than 6 suppositories in a day, or for more than a week at a time. If condition has not cleared up in this time, you should consult your physician.