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lake of fire seeds

Lake of fire seeds
Bred by Purple Caper Seeds, Blackberry Fire is a cross between Blackberry Kush and Fire Lady. Lauded for its fuel like flavor, Blackberry Fire was awarded 2nd place in the HempCon Cup Awards in 2016. With a gas like terpene profile and hints of berry, the flavor has a sour, mineral like, fruity sweetness.

Blackberry Fire Discontinued

Bred by Purple Caper Seeds, Blackberry Fire is a cross between Blackberry Kush and Fire Lady. Lauded for its fuel like flavor, Blackberry Fire was awarded 2nd place in the HempCon Cup Awards in 2016. With a gas like terpene profile and hints of berry, the flavor has a sour, mineral like, fruity sweetness.

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Description for Blackberry Fire

Bred by Purple Caper Seeds, Blackberry Fire is a cross between Blackberry Kush and Fire Lady. Lauded for its fuel like flavor, Blackberry Fire was awarded 2nd place in the HempCon Cup Awards in 2016. With a gas like terpene profile with hints of berry, the flavor has a sour, mineral-like, fruity sweetness. Blackberry Fire long lasting effects and is an excellent choice for those seeking physical relief.

Customer Reviews Write Your Own!

By Bryce musante on January 21, 2019

First of all I LOVE and TRUST Dark Heart Nursery. They have never let me down. Every clone and strain I’ve picked up has been very healthy no pests, molds or problems what so ever. Now Blackberry fire wasnt my first choice i wanted a different strain to try but the dispensary was out and i have to drive 50+ miles to get these clones so I took what i could get. I wasnt stoked on it but ill tell you i am now i haven’t pulled down yet but with two to three weeks left they are amazing. Love their size their smell and most likely their pull down weight nit to mention these are some of the frostiest plants i’ve had. Thank you Dark Heart and I can’t wait to buy new strains of clones to try.

“This is a very cost-effective means to grow a garden,” Braun, of Round Lake Park, said. “Seeds are expensive (at the store.) Plus, you get to try new things to grow.”

At ‘growing’ libraries, patrons collect seeds to grow fruits, vegetables, flowers

Their faces a study in excitment, Leng Hsieh’s 6-year-old triplets, Maleah, Kayla and Leland, sifted through free packets of flower and vegetable seeds at the Round Lake Area Public Library District Sunday.

“They love to garden,” Hsieh, of Vernon Hills, said. “They help plant and water, and they enjoy eating, too — especially carrots.”

All three youngsters selected a packet of carrots to take home with them during the grand opening of the library district’s “seed library.” Patrons can choose six free packets per visit to take home and nurture into flowers, vegetables and other plants.

It’s a growing movement — local garden clubs, food pantries and gardeners collect seeds from their flowers and vegetables, package the seeds and donate them to a library, which keeps them available for patrons to take during regular library hours.

Returning the seeds is optional, and no library card is needed; no fees or fines are involved. Gardeners who take seeds for the library can collect them at the end of the growing season from their own gardens and bring them back for someone else to use. The program is based on an honor system, and it’s working well at the Fremont Public Library in Mundelein, which started a seed library a year ago, according to Rachael Rezek, the community services librarian there.

“That’s traditionally what people would do,” Rezek, of Grayslake, said. “We kind of lost that knowledge. That’s the whole goal of seed libraries, to help people reacquire that knowledge we’ve always had. To me, it’s a really nice distillation of what the purpose of a library is. You’re sharing resources, and the whole community is wishing you well.”

According to the American Libraries Association, state laws vary on whether seed libraries can be operated, and as of 2015, more than 300 seed libraries existed in the nation, most of them run by public libraries. Rezek said Illinois law recently changed to allow seed libraries to exist in the state.

At the Round Lake seed library opening, volunteer and Round Lake Area Garden Club member Holly Braun helped visitors browse among the 10,000 packets of seeds available for the public to use. Master gardeners, volunteers, garden club members and others offered advice on growing plants from seeds.

Available were seeds to grow common plants such as zinnia, fennel, basil, common milkweed and peas, as well as unusual and heirloom plants including San Marzano tomatoes, black turtle beans and daikon radish, along with dozens of types of red, green and black lettuces.

“This is a very cost-effective means to grow a garden,” Braun, of Round Lake Park, said. “Seeds are expensive (at the store.) Plus, you get to try new things to grow.”

When the Round Lake Area Garden Club held its first seed exchange last year, she was able to try three new types of tomatoes in her garden, including black Japanese heirloom tomatoes. “They’re beautiful,” she said.