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industrial hemp seeds for growing for sale

This feminization process must be carried out using carefully selected mother plants in order to reduce the prevalence of hermaphroditism in seeds created in this manner.

Feminized Hemp Seeds For Sale

Industrial Hemp Seeds

Top quality feminized hemp seeds for sale from Bulkanna! We are industrial hemp seed suppliers for high CBD hemp cultivars such as Berry Blossom and Cherry Blossom. These USA strains are bred to produce low-THC industrial hemp flowers with CBD concentrations suitable for efficient extraction. Contact us today to learn more about our current pricing on our available feminized seed stock for 2019.

What Is Feminized Hemp Seed?

Feminized hemp seeds refer to seeds that have been produced from female hemp plants that have been forced or coaxed into producing male flowers utilizing a variety of different methods.

Since the hemp plants chosen for creating the seeds are female to begin with, forced male flowers on these plants will carry almost all X chromosomes and the seeds resulting from a self pollination will be female plants at around at 99% rate.

These feminized seeds will carry a double XX chromosome instead of the standard XY split that results from traditional pollination from a male plant.

How Is Hemp Seed Feminized?

Feminized hemp seeds can be produced in a number of ways:

Most simply, female plants may be left to grow un-pollinated far beyond their natural harvest date, which will then cause many varieties of cannabis to throw out male flowers in response to the stress.

Essentially, as the plant reaches its maturity, and has still not been able to fulfill it’s mission to reproduce and create seeds, it then resorts to whatever measures it has to take to ensure its future generations through self pollination which can include producing its own male flowers.

However not all strains of cannabis will produce male flowers predictably in this fashion, making this process of feminization less feasible on a commercial scale.

A more reliable and commonly used method of creating feminized seed is to apply a solution of gibberellic acid or colloidal silver to select female plants which in turn will also stimulate the production of male flowers.

The pollen produced by these male flowers would in turn be considered feminized pollen and will carry almost 100% female chromosomes. Any female flowers subsequently pollinated with this pollen will produce nearly 100% female offspring utilizing this technique.

Hermaphrodites

This feminization process must be carried out using carefully selected mother plants in order to reduce the prevalence of hermaphroditism in seeds created in this manner.

Cannabis plants will naturally show hermaphroditic traits across various phenotypes, thus seeds produced from plants with hermaphroditic genetic traits beget more hermaphroditic offspring… instead of the desired 99% and above ratio of females plants obtained from proper feminization.

Mother plant selections from proven genetics are crucial for this reason in the creation of stable, predictable, feminized seed stock with a low prevalence of hermaphroditic expressions.

High CBD Industrial Hemp Seeds

“High CBD” feminized hemp seeds are produced simply by selecting high CBD, low THC cultivars of industrial hemp and using one of the above processes in order to produce a feminized seed with the desired genetic profile.

This is something that the Government is keen on, and it has everything to do with the level of THC that’s allowed here in Australia. When you look into starting a farm, you will see that other countries allow for slightly different THC levels in their industrial hemp crop. It is of paramount importance that you select the right strain – especially with Australia’s strict regulations regarding industrial hemp. The Government wants a seller, also if you get your seeds from other parts of the world, to be licensed in their country of origin.

Buying Hemp Seeds for Growing Purposes

Buying seeds to grow industrial hemp is quite complex, especially here in Australia. Things become even more complex when you are a farmer that is trying to become certified organic.

In terms of seeds there are a couple of things to consider:

  • the strain (fibre, seeds, hurd or a combination)
  • possible genetic modification
  • the seller’s reputation
  • the import rules

The Strain

It is worth really looking into the type of industrial hemp that matches your business plan as a hemp grower. If you are looking online,‘seed bank’ is a search term that will produce some results. There are strains that produce more seeds than others, which is great if you are growing for food purposes You will also find strains that exceed the average length, which is great if you want to use long outs >are released that excel in multiple and sometimes even all areas.

The companies that sell hemp seeds usually also talk about the climate conditions that their hemp strains will perform best in. Definitely something to look into, because it could play a huge role in how well your hemp farm performs.

The most untouched variety of industrial hemp, as far as I have figured out, is monoecious. This means that it only has one sex, either female or male. What you will come across more and more are dioecious strains, which are hemp strains that are both female and male. These strains will be able to fertilise as well as carry seeds.

Genetic Modification

For me, this is a touchy subject. I am very much against companies like Monsanto creating their modified crops that sustain the depletion of the soil and create bad situations for farmers. I have been asking myself, is all the modification that is going on in this sector just tweaking to certain advantages, or full-blown genetic modification?

In other words, are they creating little and big tomatoes, or are they creating Monsanto crops?

This question has not been answered clearly, even when contacting certifying bodies for organic farming here in Australia, they could not give me a clear answer. One person even let slip that they had just had a very similar discussion and had not yet reached consensus.

The Finola hemp strain seems to come with a set of rules that almost make it look like a patented plant – which would suggest genetic modification, because a genetic modification would be the requirement to create a patent for a plant. Finola is one of those varieties that does well in many different areas and climates. In my mind tweaking is fine, after all, we eat different types of cucumbers, apples, tomatoes etc., but I think we should stay clear of genetic modification.

The Seller’s Reputation

This is something that the Government is keen on, and it has everything to do with the level of THC that’s allowed here in Australia. When you look into starting a farm, you will see that other countries allow for slightly different THC levels in their industrial hemp crop. It is of paramount importance that you select the right strain – especially with Australia’s strict regulations regarding industrial hemp. The Government wants a seller, also if you get your seeds from other parts of the world, to be licensed in their country of origin.

If you are in the process of becoming a certified organic farmer and you can’t get your hands on certified organic growing seeds, don’t worry. If you can prove, by receiving statements of three certified sellers, that the certified organic seeds that you want are not available in the quantity and/or quality you need, the certifying bodies will accept this. These statements, together with a statement of the seller saying that the seeds are not genetically modified and are grown without herbicides and pesticides, will allow you to grow industrial hemp, without it interfering with your farm’s conversion to certified organic.

Unfortunately, there are not a lot of certified organic hemp strains at the moment worldw >strain of industrial hemp.

Import Rules

The Department’s Biosecurity Import Conditions system (BICON) details all the exact rules and regulations on their website. —link—-

Long story short, if you are considering importing genetically modified hemp, you need an import permit. If this is not the case, you will still need to check if your seeds need a phytosanitary certificate, which is all about the potential impact on native flora.

The seller you end up buying your seeds from needs to be able to comply with Australian packaging regulations. This means that they are responsible for making sure there is no soil, animal material insects, diseases or other things apart from the seeds in the package. There are criteria for correct labelling as well and every package will be tested and inspected, for which you will pay the bill.

Personally, I found the collection of different industrial hemp strains in Australia quite limited and the strict import rules are not making it easy on you. I would recommend talking to Australian farmers that are growing industrial hemp for the same outcome in the same climate that you are considering , and ask them if they will sell their seeds to you.