Posted on

hemp seeds iron

Flax is high in Essential Fatty Acids, like all the seeds mentioned, containing 55-57% of Omega 3 fatty acid, ALA. As well, Flax is high in both insoluble and soluble fiber – the benefits of such are good for lowering cholesterol and adding bulk and movement in your stool. On top of these, flax also contains what is known as Lignans, (which is a phytoestrogen which help to normalize estrogen levels in women) and act as an antioxidant. “Lignan helps lower cholesterol levels, protects against colon cancer and helps to prevent the formation of gallstones” (Balch, 53).

Chia, Hemp and Flax Seeds

Have you seen these little seeds at the grocery store? They’re causing a lot of talk and people seem to think they’re good for you. So what exactly is the difference between chia seeds, hemps seeds, and flax seeds?

What’s the difference between chia seeds, hemps seeds (or hearts), and flax seeds?

What are Chia Seeds?

Chia: Per 28g (1oz) : 138kcals, 4.69g Protein, 8.71g total fat, 11.94 total carbohydrates, 9.8 fiber. Vitamins and Minerals: high in B-vitamins thiamine, niacin, good in riboflavin and folate. Rich in calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and zinc.

Chia seeds come from the flowering plant, Salvia hispanica, native to Mexico and Guatemala. Carbohydrate rich, chia seeds were used by ancient civilizations in these areas as an energy booster (prescription for dietary wellness)

Chia seeds are known to be high in fibre, omega 3 fatty acids and a variety of vitamins and minerals like B-vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc.

Unlike flaxseed, which must be ground to boost the nutritional benefits, Chia seeds are easily digested. Also unlike hemp seeds, Chia seeds expand as a gel-like substance. People have come to use chia seeds gel-like application in jams, as substitute for eggs and simply to top onto salads as sprouts.

There are studies being done which begin to show the nutritional benefits of chia seeds such as: improving

What are Hemp Seeds?

Hemp: Per 30g serving: 174kcals, 14g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 2g total carbs, 1g fiber, 11g protein. Hemp seeds are high in iron, magnesium and zinc.

Hemp, part of the genus Cannabis, is grown for the fibers and seeds having little TCH, and should not be confused with the relative marijuana. Hemp has been cultivated for fiber all over the world, and early records show as early as 2800 BCE in China. “ . Hempseed has been documented as a source of food throughout recorded history – raw, cooked or roasted, and hempseed oil has been used as a food/medicine in China for at least 3000 years”(Osburn).

As a seed, or oil, hemp contains all essential amino acids, and as a plant source contains them in an easily digestible form, “since hemp seed protein is 65% globulin edistin, and also includes quantities of albumin, its protein is readily available in a form quite similar to that found in blood plasma”. (The Most nutritionally complete food source).

Hemp is a great source of Essential Fatty Acids, those which our body cannot make, and which must be obtained through diet, providing fluidity to the phospholipid bilayer of our cell membranes, “especially in the construction of neuronal membranes within the central nervous system” (Callaway, 69).

What are Flax Seeds?

Flax: 1 TBSP (7grams) ground flax: 37 kcals, 2.96g fat, 2.02g carbohydrates, 1.9g dietary fiber, 1.8g protein. Vitamins and minerals: high in B1, magnesium and phosphorus, but also in a variety of other b-vitamins, iron, zinc and B6.

Flax, coming from the blue flowering plant family Linaceae, and has been cultivated for its seeds, and oil (flaxseed or linseed oil). It has a slightly nutty flavour and is good to add to smoothies, oatmeal or cereal, as a salad dressing, the possibilities are endless.. unless they involve heat. Heating flaxseed will render the oil unstable and it will go rancid.

Flax is high in Essential Fatty Acids, like all the seeds mentioned, containing 55-57% of Omega 3 fatty acid, ALA. As well, Flax is high in both insoluble and soluble fiber – the benefits of such are good for lowering cholesterol and adding bulk and movement in your stool. On top of these, flax also contains what is known as Lignans, (which is a phytoestrogen which help to normalize estrogen levels in women) and act as an antioxidant. “Lignan helps lower cholesterol levels, protects against colon cancer and helps to prevent the formation of gallstones” (Balch, 53).

Whole flaxseed is edible and does provide both fiber and omega 3s, they are not easily digested. By grinding flaxseed, this increases the availability of the Lignans. Due to the shell, Flaxseed is stable at room temperature; however, once ground, refrigeration is necessary.

What should I eat?

Well that depends entirely on what you are looking for in your diet.

  • All three seeds are great sources of good, healthy fat – by adding them to various foods, you can help the absorption of fat soluble vitamins.
  • Low fiber diet? Including flaxmeal (or chia) is a great source to help move things through your digestive track.
  • If you’re a vegetarian or vegan, the best choice for protein is the hemp seeds.

Hemp seeds iron
I’m so late to the hemp seeds party, I know.
Better late than never though.
It’s been over two years that I keep hearing about hemp seeds (and, in particular about their amazing health benefits) but never bothered looking into them.
It’s time to make amends.

Hemp seeds iron

I’m so late to the hemp seeds party, I know.
Better late than never though.
It’s been over two years that I keep hearing about hemp seeds (and, in particular about their amazing health benefits) but never bothered looking into them.
It’s time to make amends.

What are hemp seeds?

Hemp seeds are the seeds of Cannabis sativa. Technically a nut, hemp seeds contain over 30% oil and about 25% protein, with considerable amounts of dietary fibers and minerals.
Hemp seeds have been documented as a source of food throughout recorded history. For instance, hemp seed oil has been used as a food/medicine in China for at least 3,000 years.

Hemp seeds as food

Hemp seeds can be eaten raw, ground into a meal, sprouted, made into hemp milk, prepared as tea, and even used in baking.
1 ounce of hemp seeds yields 162 calories, 13 grams of fat, 10 grams of protein and just 2 grams of carbs.


Almost 44% of the weight of hemp seeds is edible oils, containing about 80% polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). They’re an exceptionally rich source of the two essential fatty acids (EFAs) linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linoleic acid (omega-3).
Hemp seeds have high levels of proteins. The amino acid profile is close to complete, if compared to other complete sources of protein such as meat, milk, eggs or soy.
In particular, hemp seeds contain all 21 known amino acids, including the 9 essential ones the human body cannot produce.
A direct comparison of protein amino acids profile shows that hemp seed protein is comparable to other high quality protein such as egg whites or soybeans.
Hemp seed are also a good source of trace minerals such as zinc and magnesium.

Chinese traditional medicine maintains the oldest recorded source of information on hemp seeds, both as a traditional food and as a medicine.
Anecdotal reports attribute improvements in skin quality, stronger fingernails and thicker hair to daily usage of hemp seeds over time. Generally, such improvements are considered as good indications of general health and well being.
A clinical study demonstrated the usefulness of hemp seeds oil in healing mucosal skin wounds after eye, nose and throat surgery, when applied topically.
Moreover, the fatty acid profile of hemp seed oil is remarkably similar to that of black currant seed oil, which also seems to have a beneficial impact on immunologic vigor.
Hemp seed oil has also been used in the treatment of eczema with positive results.

There’s no risk of intoxication