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hemp seeds and thc

Hemp seeds and thc
In other words, Cannabis plants with 0.3 percent or less of THC are hemp. Cannabis plants with more than 0.3 percent THC are marijuana.

Is hemp the same thing as marijuana?

There’s been a lot of discussion about hemp recently, since the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal for farmers to grow industrial hemp for the first time since the passage of the 1970 Controlled Substances Act (or, practically speaking, since the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act).

There are still quite a few restrictions and regulations associated with growing hemp, but the fact that hemp is now legal – while marijuana is not – has raised a lot of questions.

NC State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and NC State Extension, are engaged in a variety of research and educational programs related to hemp. That puts us in a position to help answer some of the most common hemp questions.

What’s the difference between hemp and marijuana?

Hemp and marijuana are, taxonomically speaking, the same plant; they are different names for the same genus (Cannabis) and species.

“Hemp and marijuana even look and smell the same,” says Tom Melton, deputy director of NC State Extension. “The difference is that hemp plants contain no more than 0.3 percent (by dry weight) of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the psychoactive substance found in marijuana. By comparison, marijuana typically contains 5 to 20 percent THC. You can’t get high on hemp.”

In other words, Cannabis plants with 0.3 percent or less of THC are hemp. Cannabis plants with more than 0.3 percent THC are marijuana.

Is it now legal to grow hemp in North Carolina?

It is legal to grow hemp, but you must be licensed.

In North Carolina, licenses must be approved by the state’s Industrial Hemp Commission, which is affiliated with the N.C. Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. Licensed growers must abide by stringent regulations, including tests to ensure that the THC levels in any hemp remain at or below the limit of 0.3 percent.

Why is there interest in growing hemp?

In short, the answer is that farmers grow things for which there is a market – and there appears to be a market for industrial hemp.

“Many see industrial hemp as a rapidly growing industry and a way to replace losses in acreage or value in other commodities,” Melton says.

What are some benefits and uses of hemp?

Industrial hemp has many potential uses. Hemp fibers can be used in textiles or industrial processes. Hemp can also be used for grain, and the flowers are often used as a source for cannabidiol, a hemp extract also known as CBD.

“Ninety-five percent of North Carolina hemp crops are grown for their flowers,” Melton says. “CBD is widely acclaimed for use in addressing many aches, pains and mental disorders. However, there is little data supporting many of the claims.”

And the regulatory requirements related to CBD can be confusing.

Is growing hemp for CBD legal?

“Growing hemp for its flowers was already legal, prior to the 2018 Farm Bill, under the 2014 Farm Bill,” Melton says. “The 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to have Industrial Hemp Pilot Research Programs, under which any part of the hemp plant could be produced by a licensed grower.

Hemp seeds and thc
Fibre – hemp seed contains both soluble and insoluble fibres. Soluble fibre can be dissolved in water and while they are still an important part of your diet, they get assimilated by the body before being passed. Insoluble fibre cannot be dissolved and pass through the body intact. This kind of fibre is typically lacking in our diets as we do not eat many food items that do not break down. Insoluble fibre is a very important part of any diet as it aids in gently cleaning out the digestive tract.

Hemp seeds and thc

What is THC

THC is the active ingredient in marijuana, the one that produces psychoactive results. Hemp is grown in Canada in such a way that it produces little or no THC in the plant. Hemp seeds themselves do not contain THC, only the leaves of the plant hold this chemical. Typically the seed gets contaminated by THC when it is being harvested as the leaves of the plant, and the protective sheath that surrounds the seed, contain levels of THC which can transfer to the seed during processing. In order to counteract this problem, we clean the hemp seeds to 99.99% clean, which removes all of the plant matter from the seed resulting in a product that can actually be 0.00% THC. Our rigorous testing actually finds that the seed, after cleaning, has no detectible levels of THC down to 4 parts per million.

What is hemp seed good for

Protein – hemp seeds contain all the essential amino acids you require. This means that you no longer need to eat any meat as part of your diet to ensure you get enough proteins. The protein in hemp is also very easily digestible as it closely resembles the proteins in your blood. Check out the amino acid profile of hemp seed on our site.

Fibre – hemp seed contains both soluble and insoluble fibres. Soluble fibre can be dissolved in water and while they are still an important part of your diet, they get assimilated by the body before being passed. Insoluble fibre cannot be dissolved and pass through the body intact. This kind of fibre is typically lacking in our diets as we do not eat many food items that do not break down. Insoluble fibre is a very important part of any diet as it aids in gently cleaning out the digestive tract.

What is made from hemp seed

There are four main commodities that are produced from the seed: whole seed, shelled seed (also known as hulled seed or hemp hearts), oil and products produced from the pressing of the seed for oil.

  • Whole Seed – you would consume whole hemp seed for the proteins and fibre and to a lesser degree the oils. Due to international laws we are required to reduce the viability of the seed by using heat to sterilize it. This does do some damage to the oils, but the protein and fibre are left intact. While the shell is quite crunchy, it is not difficult to eat.
  • Shelled Seed – this is the whole seed without the shell. We do not have to heat this product since by removing the shell, you would not be able to sprout it. This product would be consumed for the proteins and the oils and it really tastes great. The inner part of the hemp seed is soft and has a wonderful nutty flavour.
  • Hemp Seed Oil – you would consume the oil as an excellent source of essential fatty acids (EFAs). These long chain poly-unsaturated fats are considered “the good fats” as they are the building blocks of our immune systems. They are called essential because you have to get them from your diet. A diet lacking in EFAs can contribute to simple items like dry skin but can also become more severe like allergic reactions and compromised immune response.
  • Hemp Protein Powder/Hemp Flour – this is a product that is made from the left overs of pressing for oil. It is a great way to get your proteins and some fibre as well. Not all protein powders are the same so make sure you check what percentage proteins are in the powder you are looking at. Protein percentages of less than 35% should be considered hemp flour as there is then more fibre than protein.