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happy roots seeds

The secret to the mask-slash-shampoo’s success? A blend of oats, which work to remove hard water mineral build up and pollutants while absorbing oil, tagua seed powder and jojoba esters to exfoliate gently, and vitamin B-rich carrot seed oil to rebalance and hydrate your scalp and roots to support healthy new hair growth. Together, the naturally powerful ingredients whisk away what shouldn’t be there while supplementing your scalp with what it needs. To use as a mask, massage into damp or dry hair in targeted spots and let rest for three to five minutes — as a shampoo, apply all over and lather it up before rinsing for light exfoliation.

Seed Phytonutrients’ New Scalp & Roots Oat Mask Doubles As Shampoo — Here’s How It Works

The sudden influx of scalp-focused hair care products this year probably incites one of two reactions: Either you jump for joy (finally something to banish flakes and itch for good), or you sigh at the suggestion of yet another step added to your routine. Whichever camp you call home, you can’t deny that scalp health is important — after all, healthy hair grows from healthy, happy roots. So, news that Seed Phytonutrients’ new Scalp & Roots Oat Mask acts as a two-in-one shampoo and scalp treatment to streamline your time spent in the shower should be music to your ears. Giving your scalp the TLC it deserves just got a whole lot simpler.

Between scrubs (salt, sugar, or even champagne-infused), detoxing shampoos, treatment sprays, and masks, it’s undeniable that scalp treatments have been a trending beauty category of 2019. The scalp-care craze is showing no signs of slowing down as new hair products start rolling out this fall, which is good news for you (and your head) as colder, drier weather approaches and threatens to rock the equilibrium at your roots. And Seed Phytonutrients’ newest scalp-soothing launch is one you’ll want to have on hand this season.

The green and natural hair and skincare brand’s new Scalp & Roots Oat Mask, $28, launched on Oct. 1 exclusively at Ulta and it’s here to rescue you from multi-step hair routines focused on fixing up the delicate skin and roots at your scalp. It’s formulated with sustainable, clean ingredients (in zero-waste packaging to boot) and designed not only as a detoxing mask but as a clarifying shampoo, too. Whether you’re dealing with a whole lot of buildup or just need to whisk away some flakes and product residue, this multi-tasker is your new BFF.

The secret to the mask-slash-shampoo’s success? A blend of oats, which work to remove hard water mineral build up and pollutants while absorbing oil, tagua seed powder and jojoba esters to exfoliate gently, and vitamin B-rich carrot seed oil to rebalance and hydrate your scalp and roots to support healthy new hair growth. Together, the naturally powerful ingredients whisk away what shouldn’t be there while supplementing your scalp with what it needs. To use as a mask, massage into damp or dry hair in targeted spots and let rest for three to five minutes — as a shampoo, apply all over and lather it up before rinsing for light exfoliation.

Ready for a scalp product that’ll save you precious time in the shower? Snag Seed Phytonutrients’ newest launch, below.

This two-in-one mask is formulated with clean, sustainable ingredients like oats, jojoba ester, and carrot seed oil as a clarifying shampoo and detox mask treatment. Use it as a deep cleaning shampoo to wash away mild and moderate buildup, or apply to targeted areas and let sit for three to five minutes for a full detox.

“We bought from farmers, cut out the middle layers, and paid them 50 per cent more than their usual income. Farmers do not earn more than 15-20 per cent of the end-consumer’s rupee,” says Sathe. “When I received threats, I realised my work is impacting someone in the ecosystem,” she says. Happy Roots has generated a revenue of Rs 3.5 lakh since its launch in 2016. But Sathe does not want to limit herself to food processing. Happy Roots is also working to revive several indigenous grains. For instance, it is undertaking contract farming of the indigenous Buckwheat. This has increased the income of tribal women farmers it works with in Ahmednagar by 300 per cent. “Happy Roots is building a transparent value chain where small and marginal farmers are equal partners and own 50 per cent. We partner with farmers for pre-harvest (seed conservation, farming of indigenous grains) as well as post-harvest management (manufacturing healthy snack food),” says Sathe.

Happy roots seeds

Reema Sathes venture is raising farmers incomes, reviving indigenous grain varieties.

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REEMA SATHE Founder Director, Happy Roots Foods & Beverages (Photo: Rachit Goswami)

Reema Sathe worked in the food and beverage industry for seven years before starting Happy Roots to empower marginal farmers, even those without own land, with sustainable income. Today, the social enterprise, which makes gourmet snack food such as crackers and cookies, has a network of 15,000 farmers and 2,000 rural women in Vidarbha, Kolhapur and Pune in Maharashtra, with land access of 25,000 acres and a pool of 120 indigenous varieties. “We want to become the largest healthy snack food brand in the country that represents small and marginal farmers,” says Sathe. For production, she is using a private facility in Pune.

Sathe’s rural journey started with a stint at Krishi Star, a start-up working with small farmers in Gujarat where, distressed at farmers’ suicides, she built a community of poultry farmers, and with the help of the state government’s CAIM (Convergence of Agricultural Intervention in Maharashtra) programme and an NGO, Chetana Organic, gave farmers from 25 villages free-range chicks. Every morning, the farmers would give her fresh eggs that she delivered to restaurant chefs in Pune. The chefs loved them. The farmers’ income rose 150 per cent within a short period. But there was one difficulty. Though the eggs were tastier and more nutritional, they were costlier and prone to rot or break during transportation. “I searched for a more sustainable model and decided to set up a non-perishable supply chain. The idea was to involve farmers in food processing,” she says.

A chemical engineer with a degree in food and hospitality management, Sathe, who has worked with Mahindra Holidays, Sodexo and Ecolab, spoke to nearly 100 people to understands the gaps in the food eaten in urban areas. The response and a chance meeting with an NRI threw up the idea of starting a healthy snack food outfit. Sathe – awarded the Nari Shakti Puraskar by the Ministry of Women and Child Development and the Phoenix Leading Lady Award for excellence in the social enterprise sector – pumped in Rs 10 lakh from her savings to set up the venture.

“We bought from farmers, cut out the middle layers, and paid them 50 per cent more than their usual income. Farmers do not earn more than 15-20 per cent of the end-consumer’s rupee,” says Sathe. “When I received threats, I realised my work is impacting someone in the ecosystem,” she says. Happy Roots has generated a revenue of Rs 3.5 lakh since its launch in 2016. But Sathe does not want to limit herself to food processing. Happy Roots is also working to revive several indigenous grains. For instance, it is undertaking contract farming of the indigenous Buckwheat. This has increased the income of tribal women farmers it works with in Ahmednagar by 300 per cent. “Happy Roots is building a transparent value chain where small and marginal farmers are equal partners and own 50 per cent. We partner with farmers for pre-harvest (seed conservation, farming of indigenous grains) as well as post-harvest management (manufacturing healthy snack food),” says Sathe.

(Moupia Basu is a freelance writer based in Pune)