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growing hemp seeds

Air
An appropriate cultivation room remains reasonably cool during the summer. Ventilation is top priority when setting up an appropriate cultivation room, which is clean and bug free. It’s important that you purchase a good suction pump and a fan, so that fresh air can come in and old air can be directly pumped outside. That way you can control the oxygen content and the humidity level of the air.

Indoor cultivation

You can use Suzy’s premium cannabis seeds for both outdoor and indoor cultivation. However, decide if you want to cultivate inside or outside before you buy the seeds. Some types are appropriate for indoor cultivation while others on the contrary grow better outside. Indoor cultivation has both advantages and disadvantages.

Advantages of growing cannabis seeds indoor:

  1. The cannabis remains clean and free from parasites, germs and fungus traces.
  2. Environmental factors can be controlled and you manage the growing circumstances yourself.
  3. You can cultivate cannabis the whole year, with possible multiple harvests a year.

Disadvantages of growing cannabis seeds indoor:

  1. You have to posses good technical knowledge. You have to know for instance how to set up the installation and how to maintain it.
  2. Purchase costs of the installation and other requirements can be demanding.

Suzy’s Choice for indoor cultivation:

What do you have to keep in mind with indoor cultivation?

The most important factors for the growth of your cannabis plants are: air, light and soil.

Air
An appropriate cultivation room remains reasonably cool during the summer. Ventilation is top priority when setting up an appropriate cultivation room, which is clean and bug free. It’s important that you purchase a good suction pump and a fan, so that fresh air can come in and old air can be directly pumped outside. That way you can control the oxygen content and the humidity level of the air.

Light
It is important that the cultivation room can be made completely dark. The duration of the night is very important for the cannabis plants so make sure that you use a timer to create a regular cycle. There are different wattage lamps to cultivate cannabis. You can choose from 400 watt, 600 watt or 1000 watt. High pressure sodium lamps are ideal for indoor cultivation (gaseous discharge lamps). The lamps should be replaced on a yearly basis in order to create optimal light.

Soil
The bigger the pot, the easier it is for the cannabis plant to grow. When a cannabis plant has filled the pot with roots, it needs to be repotted to a bigger one so that the roots can grow again. Make sure you use clean soil with a good texture, which determines the capacity to hold and drain away water. You also have to use the right amount of nutrients (nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, et cetera). The PH value needs to be about 6.5. This determines the absorption of nutrients of the roots. Appropriate soil is available in grow shops.

Suzy’s Tip: Never use soil for outside for indoor cultivation. You could introduce harmful parasites and insects.

Don’t sow any seeds until you’ve researched state and federal regulations. The 2018 Farm Bill contained provisions legalizing hemp production, but you still need a license to grow it. Plant in an inconspicuous location. Gilkison knows a farmer who lost much of his crop to thieves who, he suspects, were selling his hemp buds mixed with marijuana. “If you want something that’s going to yield good, put it on good ground,” he says. He prefers deep, humus-rich soil. Hemp seeds contain sex chromosomes that produce male and female plants. For CBD, you’ll want to keep only the more robust females. Either weed out the male seedlings or plant female-only clones.

How to Grow Hemp

By Malia Wollan

    Feb. 14, 2019

“Sooner or later, somebody is going to make a joke about you getting high,” says Brennan Gilkison, a 42-year-old hemp farmer in central Kentucky who has no interest in getting high. For centuries, American farmers grew hemp for fiber, oil and many other uses. George Washington cultivated it at Mount Vernon to mend fishing nets. Gilkison’s crop goes into products containing cannabidiol, or CBD. People still titter. Practice your explainer, which should go something like this: Marijuana and hemp are varieties of the same species of cannabis plant, but hemp contains less than 0.3 percent of the mind-altering tetrahydrocannabinols, or THC, and will not get you high. “You become an educator,” he says. (Third graders visit his farm on field trips.)

Don’t sow any seeds until you’ve researched state and federal regulations. The 2018 Farm Bill contained provisions legalizing hemp production, but you still need a license to grow it. Plant in an inconspicuous location. Gilkison knows a farmer who lost much of his crop to thieves who, he suspects, were selling his hemp buds mixed with marijuana. “If you want something that’s going to yield good, put it on good ground,” he says. He prefers deep, humus-rich soil. Hemp seeds contain sex chromosomes that produce male and female plants. For CBD, you’ll want to keep only the more robust females. Either weed out the male seedlings or plant female-only clones.

Put your seeds or starts in the ground in late spring and harvest in the fall. Weeds will be your biggest challenge. “We’ve weeded by hand, with machines, even with fire,” Gilkison says. Because, he says, he can’t use herbicides or pesticides on his hemp, Gilkison spends much of the growing season battling back pigweed, Johnson grass and crab grass. Prune the maturing plants to force them to produce more buds (some farmers use tobacco topping machines to mow the upper vegetation). Some growers in Kentucky have recently turned land over from tobacco to hemp. “Everywhere you look, it’s CBD this, CBD that,” Gilkison says. The money has been good, and a giddiness has taken hold, thanks to this plant that has been effectively prohibited since the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act. “It’s the first time in our lives that we’ve had a new crop and had to learn how to grow it,” he says.

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