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do hemp seeds have cbd

Do hemp seeds have cbd
It’s still too early to tell, and results can vary depending on the person. If there’s a beauty brand making such claims, you may want to do extra consumer research as brands aren’t obligated to tell you how much CBD is in a product.

CBD Oil vs. Hemp Seed: How to Know What You’re Paying For

In 2018, a farm bill passed making industrial hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD) legal nationwide. Because of this, there’s been a “green rush” of cannabis-inspired products flooding the market — including beauty products.

While CBD is a new ingredient to many consumers (since it’s now more readily available), hempseed oil has been around for decades and sold at health food stores for both cooking and skincare. However, when CBD and hempseed oil are put side by side, a lot of misleading labeling happens.

First, a Cannabis species (Cannabaceae) breakdown

To filter through the CBD marketing, here’s a cannabis breakdown: Cannabis (often referred to as marijuana) and hemp are two varieties of the same plant species, cannabis sativa.

Since they share the same species name, they’re often lumped into one big family and there seems to be a lot of confusion around their differences.

Marijuana Hemp Hemp seeds (cannabis sativa seed oil)
produces tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) at 20%+ levels (the psychoactive compound that makes a person feel “high.”) has to be less than 0.3% THC to be sold legally 0% THC, trace amounts of CBD
produces CBD at 10%+ levels produces CBD at 20%+ used as food such as hempseed milk, granola, and more
medicinal and therapeutic uses for chronic pain, mental health, and illnesses stalks of the hemp plant can produce clothing, rope, paper, fuel, home insulation. (the list goes on and on) cold-pressed for oil production that can be used in cooking, beauty products, and even in paint

Why this matters in the beauty world

Hempseed oil and CBD oil are both trendy ingredients used topically in skincare products.

Hempseed oil, in particular, is known to not clog pores, be anti-inflammatory, and provide superior moisturization to keep the skin looking and feeling supple. It can be used within a product or even just on the skin as a face oil.

New research is coming out all the time about the skin benefits of CBD. What we know so far is like it’s cousin, hempseed oil, it’s been shown to be a powerful anti-inflammatory which helps in healing acne, sensitive skin, rashes, eczema, and psoriasis. It also packs a ton of antioxidants.

But is CBD beauty actually more effective or worth paying more for?

It’s still too early to tell, and results can vary depending on the person. If there’s a beauty brand making such claims, you may want to do extra consumer research as brands aren’t obligated to tell you how much CBD is in a product.

The tricky marketing tactic behind hempseed oil

With the green rush, some brands are jumping on cannabis-infused beauty products but mixing the terms up — intentionally or not. Since CBD and hempseed oil are in the same cannabis family, they’re often incorrectly marketed as the same thing.

Why would a brand do this? Simply put, consumers are willing to pay more for CBD oil, which is a pretty expensive ingredient compared to hempseed oil.

It’s easy for a brand to add hempseed oil to a product, adorn it with marijuana leaves, and highlight the word cannabis to make consumers think they’re receiving a CBD product that contains no actual CBD at all.

And paying a premium I might add!

So how can you tell what you’re purchasing? It’s pretty simple actually, check the ingredient list.

Hemp seed oil will be listed as cannabis sativa seed oil. CBD will be listed as cannabidiol, full-spectrum hemp, hemp oil, PCR (phytocannabinoid rich) or PCR hemp extracts.

While it’s not required to see the milligrams listed on the bottle, it has become a common practice to do so. If it’s not, you should wonder what’s in that bottle you’re paying for.

It’s so important to be an educated, savvy consumer. Don’t fall into the trap of weed washing (hemp-based product hype)!

Is CBD Legal? Marijuana-derived CBD products are illegal on the federal level, but are legal under some state laws. Hemp-derived CBD products (with less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal on the federal level, but are still illegal under some state laws. Check your state’s laws and those of anywhere you travel. Keep in mind that nonprescription CBD products are not FDA-approved, and may be inaccurately labeled.

Dana Murray is a licensed aesthetician from Southern California with a passion for skin care science. She’s worked in skin education, from helping others with their skin to developing products for beauty brands. Her experience extends over 15 years and an estimated 10,000 facials. She’s been using her knowledge to blog about skin and bust skin myths on her Instagram since 2016.

Do hemp seeds have cbd
There’s no solid research to back up its effectiveness on dark circles and wrinkles, but dabbing a bit on damp skin may help lock in moisture.

8 All-Natural Ingredients That Work for Eye Puffiness and Wrinkles

Walk into any beauty store on the hunt for a brand new eye cream and you’ll walk into a dizzying array of options. Between brands, ingredients, purported benefits — and potential drawbacks like cost — it can be a lot to consider.

It might seem like the eye creams marked a few hundred dollars are a sure bet, but if there’s anything we know about eye cream, a holy grail answer has yet arrive.

Plus, the science behind fading circles and wrinkles isn’t all there yet.

But it may not be necessary to choose between beauty and your bank account. That’s because some skin care experts and savvy DIYers have nailed down recipes to homemade eye creams — and in some cases, the science stacks up.

“Experimenting with homemade products can sound intimidating, but if you’re someone who likes to know exactly what you’re putting on your skin, making your own can be an awesome solution,” says Los Angeles-based makeup artist Allie Renee.

“Additionally, doing it yourself means it’s highly customizable. And as an added benefit, you’re lowering the amount of waste you are producing!”

1. Freeze coffee ice cubes

Research has shown that caffeine does more than rev up your brain when a deadline looms — it also stimulates circulation when applied to the eye area and has antioxidant properties that may help reduce the risk of wrinkles and even protect against further damage from free radicals.

By freezing java into ice cubes, you can conveniently cool your lids while constricting blood vessels, reducing swelling, and brightening up tired skin.

2. Use green tea bags

Coffee isn’t the only antiox >may help calm inflammation when applied to puffy lids.

“It helps protect skin from environmental stressors and can aid in firming and tightening the skin due to the caffeine present,” Renee says. Try soaking cotton pads in a cooled brew or apply cold tea bags directly to your eye area.

3. Take vitamin E capsules

This important nutrient found in foods like nuts and sweet potatoes isn’t just essential for eye health when absorbed through food — it’s also a powerful under-eye protector when applied topically.

“It’s especially amazing and universal!” Renee says. “It’s a strong antioxidant that has hydrating and anti-aging properties as well as promotes healing by aiding in cell regeneration.”

Research has shown topical application of the antioxidant (found in oil or capsule form) can protect against photo aging and minimize inflammation.

4. Mix in some vitamin K

One of the most widely hailed natural dark circle fighters known to researchers is this fat soluble vitamin that’s been shown to be an effective hyperpigmentation fighter when used in conjunction with retinol (vitamin A).

“It’s amazing when added to an under-eye cream or serum because it has blood clotting and healing properties [and can] help reduce the appearance of wrinkles over time,” Renee says. “Dark circle warrior!”

While the ingredient is now widely found in over-the-counter beauty products, it’s naturally derived from foods like broccoli and Brussels sprouts.

In addition to incorporating more of those power greens into your diet, you may want to try mixing a store-bought formulation with coffee — a 2015 study found that applying caffeine pads containing vitamin K showed significant improvements in dark circles.

5. Soothe with coconut oil

Though it won’t combat circles, coconut oil has been touted as a solution for fine lines and dry under-eye skin.

This common kitchen staple has been called a “superfood” for its nutritional properties, but its high concentration of small-chain fatty acids also makes it an inflammation-reducing beauty salve that can be carefully applied to your under eyes for extra moisture.

6. Lock moisture in with olive oil

Because this common cooking ingredient is rich in fat-soluble vitamins (including E and K, described above), it may be good for at-home under-eye hydration.

There’s no solid research to back up its effectiveness on dark circles and wrinkles, but dabbing a bit on damp skin may help lock in moisture.

7. Depuff with aloe vera

If you happen to have an aloe vera plant at home, you might try applying some of the juicy leaves’ contents to dry skin (including the delicate parts underneath your eyes).

Research has shown the plant is full of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and fatty acids, and has anti-inflammatory properties that could help with puffiness.

8. Massage with arnica oil

If the bluish tint under your eyes is due to dilated blood vessels, a dab of arnica may help. The topical oil formulation of the herb has been shown to improve the appearance of bruises and other skin maladies.