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do female marijuana plants have seeds

Negative stressors can combine with small interruptions of the light cycle to cause hermaphroditism, especially with less-stable, clone-only hybridized strains. When the night cycle is abnormally interrupted, it sends a mixed hormonal signal to the plant. This can cause a full female plant to throw some male flowers. Male flowers are easy to identify, especially when side by side with female flowers. Male flowers look like small bunches of bananas, which will take a week or two to swell before they burst and release their pollen.

Why am I seeing seeds in the buds of my cannabis plants?

I have an indoor growroom and in my recent harvest I found seeds in the buds, but I’m sure there are no male plants in the room. I’ve heard that light leakage can cause plants to become hermaphrodites. Is this true, and if so, do you have any tips for avoiding this?

Cannabis plants are monecious. This means they have the ability to be either male or female. Or in the case of hermaphroditism, they can be both. The reason to make sure there are no males or hermaphrodites in your garden is because male flowers make pollen. When pollen touches the white hairs on a flower, it makes a seed, and seeded weed gives you headaches. Even though there are reasons in nature hermaphroditism could be important, such as continuing the species in case there is no male present, hermaphroditism is generally a bad thing when talking about cannabis plants.

Light poisoning is the most common cause for a normal plant to hermaphrodite. Light poisoning refers to the flowering night cycle of a plant being unnaturally interrupted with light. The best way to prevent this is to close yourself inside your darkened room during the daylight, and then after allowing a few minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, check for any light leaks from covered windows, door jams, etc. Also cover all timer and appliance lights with tape.

Negative stressors can combine with small interruptions of the light cycle to cause hermaphroditism, especially with less-stable, clone-only hybridized strains. When the night cycle is abnormally interrupted, it sends a mixed hormonal signal to the plant. This can cause a full female plant to throw some male flowers. Male flowers are easy to identify, especially when side by side with female flowers. Male flowers look like small bunches of bananas, which will take a week or two to swell before they burst and release their pollen.

Finding a hermaphrodite in your growroom can happen at any stage of the flowering cycle and is indicated by the presence of male flowers growing on the same plant as female flowers. As with all species in nature this can occur in varying degrees. A plant can become slightly or majorly hermaphroditic. In cases where singular male flowers are found between the branch and stalk nodes, you should be diligently removing them as they grow. You must re-inspect the plant top to bottom every few days to be sure pollination and seeding doesn’t occur. If you find male flowers (anthers) actually growing from within the female flowers (buds) the situation is a little more dire. You can still remove all the male anatomy as it appears, but it will be harder to find and much more prevalent. This is a horrible discovery that leads to a tough decision: Should you let the plant live and risk the whole crop being ruined by seeds?

In either case, once hermaphroditism has compromised the safety and purity of your sensimilla, the plant should not be propagated further. Remember, once a hermy, always a hermy. The plant pictured here is in the tenth and what should have been the final week of ripening, but a timer failed and one light stayed on continuously for almost two weeks, causing this vegetative regrowth. Because the light was continuous, the plant made no pollen. This method of re-vegging can be used to save a flowering plant you have no copies of, but be careful, as this may cause some strains to hermaphrodite.

Purposefully causing a plant to hermaphrodite is called selfing. Gibberellic acid or colloidal silver is typically sprayed onto the female plant. This technique is used to make feminized seeds and uses the plant’s ability to be both male and female to force a female plant to produce male flowers. The pollen contained in these male flowers can only produce female seeds. Just keep in mind that feminized plants should not be used for breeding, as they were produced without a true male, making them genetically inferior.

Do female marijuana plants have seeds
Since trichomes cannot be seen by the naked eye, they must be looked at with a magnifying glass or jewelers loupe. If the trichomes are still translucent, they are not ready. At this point, they’re still producing cannabinoids, something you don’t want to interrupt. Buds will grow exponentially in the last 2 weeks, so be patient. When trichomes start turning milky white, it’s an indication they’re close. The buds still won’t be ready, but this is the time to be most attentive. Around half of the pistils should’ve darkened to an amber-brown colour by now.

A How-To Guide On Boosting Trichome Production

Sometimes, your level of growing experience isn’t enough. The best nutrients and watering cycles will only get you so far. Make sure you know what to do when looking to grow a trichome-covered plant.

Every grower is looking to get the most out of her/his cannabis plant. Whether this involves feeding it the proper nutrients or giving the right amount of light, it all comes down to trichomes. These tiny “hairs” seem to be the most common indication of a healthy and potent plant. While trichomes do not always signal a successful crop, they are essential in developing top-shelf marijuana.

Although all growers know trichomes to be important, most do not understand why the cannabis plant produces them in the first place. This is crucial to grasp if you want to achieve those deliciously resinous buds. Biologically, trichomes are used for self-defence. They’re the best natural way that female cannabis plants protect themselves from pests and pathogens. With “aggressive” aromas and tastes from terpenes and other compounds secreted by trichomes, insects tend to stay away from flowers. Trichomes also help coat the buds, defending them from harmful UV rays. By providing shadows, the plant can better control the amount of light it lets into flowers.

Today, we offer you a guide on how to get the most out of your cannabis trichomes.

GENETICS

There are two predominant factors that influence a plant’s yield and general health: genetics and environment. We can’t stress enough how crucial genetics are to start off with. If you want to achieve the best and most trichomes you can, choose genetics that are known to produce an abundance of them. When you get the best seeds, you’ve done everything possible for one of the factors. Now you only need to worry about environmental conditions. Remember, though, trichomes aren’t everything when it comes to potency. Make sure you fully understand what each strain has to offer before purchasing seeds.

When it comes to finding reliable genetics with great trichome production, you can always try Lemon Shining Silver Haze or White Widow. Both strains get their names from the white coating of trichomes that appears during flowering. These are also great options when seeking a killer high. Try them out and assess for yourself. Just remember that, although hugely important, genetics are only part of the equation; they’re the first step. With that said, once you’ve chosen the proper strain, you can focus all your attention on following the best growing practices.

LIGHTING

This will be the most important environmental factor to consider regarding trichome development. Light exposure has a heavy influence on a plant’s trichome yield. Cannabis tends to develop more resin when grown in equatorial regions. These are areas with high exposure to UV rays. As mentioned above, cannabis uses trichomes to protect the buds from too much light. By exposing the plant to UV-B light for 2-3 weeks, you’ll be able to observe a difference in trichome yield.

LEDs might also be an option for upping trichome production. These lamps don’t produce any UV-B light, but some growers believe that with just enough stress, trichome proliferation will still increase. This might be a risky option, but it could work. When exposing your plant to low-impact forms of stress, you should constantly check for signs that they are still healthy. While some stress can be beneficial for boosting trichomes, too much will bring your plants past the point of no return.

HARVESTING AT THE RIGHT TIME

For the best yields, it’s crucial that you know how to identify when it’s time to harvest by the colour of the trichomes. This is something you should start doing in the last couple weeks of the flowering stage.

Since trichomes cannot be seen by the naked eye, they must be looked at with a magnifying glass or jewelers loupe. If the trichomes are still translucent, they are not ready. At this point, they’re still producing cannabinoids, something you don’t want to interrupt. Buds will grow exponentially in the last 2 weeks, so be patient. When trichomes start turning milky white, it’s an indication they’re close. The buds still won’t be ready, but this is the time to be most attentive. Around half of the pistils should’ve darkened to an amber-brown colour by now.

The trichomes will transition from a milky white to a cloudy white tonality. Harvesting during this stage will give the most psychedelic/mental effects, but it will yield less hash than if you wait. It all depends on the grower’s preference. When trichomes finally start to turn amber, there’s no more time to waste. Harvesting during this stage will create more of a body high associated with indica strains.

There is a short, yet manageable window to achieve a good mental and physical high combination. When the trichomes still display a cloudy white colour, but are already turning slightly amber, harvesting will result in a nice mix of effects. A good time to chop is when ¼ of the trichomes have turned amber, while the others remain cloudy.

OTHER FACTORS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER

Humidity and temperature can also alter the trichome yield of a cannabis plant. With the right combination of these, you can simulate a more stressful environment where the plant believes it should increase trichome production. In the last 2-3 weeks of flowering (around the same time you should increase UV-B exposure), toggling humidity and temperature will be key. Try decreasing the relative humidity (RH) levels to around 30%. Some very resinous plants grow in the Middle East where the weather is quite dry and arid.

Although, this being the case, your temperature should not surpass 26°C (80°F). Having higher temperatures won’t affect your trichome yield, but it will ruin their potency. That’s something you definitely don’t want. To verify that temperatures are correct, give your buds a good smell. If you encounter a very pungent aroma, it might be an indication the temperature is too high. This will gradually degrade your trichomes, so be careful.

Routine checks are necessary for growers of all experience levels. Always monitor your plants for any nutrient deficiencies. Nutrient uptake will seriously contribute to your frosty buds and the overall health of the plant. Even factors like airflow and proper watering practices are essential concerns for proper trichome development.

You’ll have to put in the work if you want a healthy, resinous, and potent plant. It’s not going to be easy, but hopefully this is something you truly love and take pride in doing. Be sure to show your care when harvest season comes along. Take all of the above into consideration when you plant your next seed. Just remember, “where there’s a will, there’s a way.” Good luck with your next crop!