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cannabis sativa seed extract

Cannabis sativa seed extract
Since both are essentially wellness ingredients, you won’t exactly be harmed if you accidentally purchase or use one instead of the other; however, if you’re trying to reap the maximum benefits of CBD oil, hemp seed oil won’t deliver…which is a problem considering that these oils don’t come cheap. “Unfortunately, we see a number of brands cynically cashing in on the popularity and cannabis trend and even making false claims that their products contain CBD when they contain none,” says Capobianco. “Some brands are calling hemp seed oil cannabis sativa oil, which is deceiving.”

CBD and hemp seed oil are totally different things—here’s what to know

In this plant-happy world we live in, you can find me slathering cannabidiol or CBD on my muscles to relieve soreness, applying it to my skin to soothe inflammation, and dropping it into my daily water for stress relief. In fairness, I’m drinking the proverbial Kool-Aid, but until recently I didn’t recognize the difference between hemp oil vs CBD oil, and as it happens, there’s a big one.

These days, the green-washing on CBD products can be hard to navigate, and the vocab one needs to navigate the CBD-lined shelves is extensive to say the least. Brands want to get in on the much-praised benefits, after all—but the issue here is that the terms being marketed under the “cannabis” umbrella aren’t all the same thing.

Truth be told, oftentimes, you’ll see the cannabis plant touted on a label, but the specific ingredient being used isn’t so crystal clear. And there are any number of ingredients that can come from the cannabis or hemp plants from hemp oil to CBD oil to cannabis sativa seed oil, each of which have their own unique benefits, despite often being used interchangeably. To clear up the confusion, I sought out advice from the pros.

CBD oil

CBD is a term signifying a component of the cannabis plant that comes with the much-talked about anti-inflammatory benefits, and you’re seeing it on everything from skin-care products to high-vibe tinctures. It’s extracted from the leaves, flowers, and stalks of the cannabis plant. “Cannabidiol—known as CBD—is one of over a hundred active compounds or cannabinoids found exclusively in the cannabis plant,” says Cindy Capobianco, co-founder of Lord Jones. “CBD acts as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory, which reduces pain and inflammation. It’s been used for centuries to successfully provide pain relief to muscle aches, arthritis, joint pain, neuropathic conditions, headaches, and to aid skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, even sunburn, and bug bites when used topically.” Phew. When ingested, Capobianco notes that the anti-inflammatory powers remain, and it “provides relief from anxiety and promotes a calm sense of well-being,” she says.

The cannabinoid itself is a potent, highly anti-inflammatory antioxidant. “It’s been shown in multiple studies to reduce lipid product from the sebaceous glands—and the overproduction of this sebum is what leads to acne,” says Ashley Lewis, co-founder of Fleur Marché, a new online CBD retail destination. You’ll see it on product labels as the following terms: CBD, hemp CBD, and phytocannabinoid-rich hemp oil. Hence the obvious confusion.

Hemp oil

Hemp seed oil, on the other hand, is relative to many other carrier oils—along the lines of sunflower seed oil and jojoba oil—in that it’s a cold-pressed extract from seeds. “Hemp seed oil, sometimes referred to as cannabis sativa seed oil, is perfectly good seed oil that’s high in antioxidants, omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, but contains no CBD,” explains Capobianco. “Hemp seed or cannabis sativa seed oil has been available in health food stores for decades and abundantly present in smoothies and skin care.”

So this means it has absolutely no cannabinoids in it—not CBD, THC, or CBN, says Lewis. “It’s generally viewed as a superfood and is great for adding nutritional value to your diet,” she says. “In terms of skin care, it’s known as a powerful moisturizer and skin softener that doesn’t clog pores or contribute to oily skin—it has a comedogenic rating of zero.” It shows up on the product label as hemp seed oil, cannabis sativa (hemp) seed oil, virgin hemp oil, and hemp oil.

The problem with the mix-up

Since both are essentially wellness ingredients, you won’t exactly be harmed if you accidentally purchase or use one instead of the other; however, if you’re trying to reap the maximum benefits of CBD oil, hemp seed oil won’t deliver…which is a problem considering that these oils don’t come cheap. “Unfortunately, we see a number of brands cynically cashing in on the popularity and cannabis trend and even making false claims that their products contain CBD when they contain none,” says Capobianco. “Some brands are calling hemp seed oil cannabis sativa oil, which is deceiving.”

Sure, they both come from the same plant, but they’re significantly different beyond that: “The biggest issue is that hemp seed oil and CBD are two totally different compounds that come from different parts of the hemp plant, have different makeups, and different benefits,” says Lewis. “Marketing them as the same thing just isn’t accurate and does a disservice to consumers who are expecting certain benefits that they won’t get from hemp seed oil and who are often paying more for what they think is CBD.”

To make sure you’re not falling into any marketing traps, it’s key to check the product label. “If you’re looking for the unique benefits of CBD, make sure you’re purchasing a product that clearly states it contains it,” says Capobianco. “Read labels, ask questions, and know what you’re buying.” That savviness will help the wellness industry continue to reap—and normalize—the plant’s benefits, which is a win-win for all.

On a similar note, this is what happened when I swapped out my beauty routine for all CBD skin-care products. And this is the low-down on CBN, the other cannabinoid you should know about.

Cannabis sativa seed extract
Walk into any beauty store on the hunt for a brand new eye cream and you’ll walk into a dizzying array of options. Between brands, ingredients, purported benefits — and potential drawbacks like cost — it can be a lot to consider.

8 All-Natural Ingredients That Work for Eye Puffiness and Wrinkles

Walk into any beauty store on the hunt for a brand new eye cream and you’ll walk into a dizzying array of options. Between brands, ingredients, purported benefits — and potential drawbacks like cost — it can be a lot to consider.

It might seem like the eye creams marked a few hundred dollars are a sure bet, but if there’s anything we know about eye cream, a holy grail answer has yet arrive.

Plus, the science behind fading circles and wrinkles isn’t all there yet.

But it may not be necessary to choose between beauty and your bank account. That’s because some skin care experts and savvy DIYers have nailed down recipes to homemade eye creams — and in some cases, the science stacks up.

“Experimenting with homemade products can sound intimidating, but if you’re someone who likes to know exactly what you’re putting on your skin, making your own can be an awesome solution,” says Los Angeles-based makeup artist Allie Renee.

“Additionally, doing it yourself means it’s highly customizable. And as an added benefit, you’re lowering the amount of waste you are producing!”

1. Freeze coffee ice cubes

Research has shown that caffeine does more than rev up your brain when a deadline looms — it also stimulates circulation when applied to the eye area and has antioxidant properties that may help reduce the risk of wrinkles and even protect against further damage from free radicals.

By freezing java into ice cubes, you can conveniently cool your lids while constricting blood vessels, reducing swelling, and brightening up tired skin.

2. Use green tea bags

Coffee isn’t the only antiox >may help calm inflammation when applied to puffy lids.

“It helps protect skin from environmental stressors and can aid in firming and tightening the skin due to the caffeine present,” Renee says. Try soaking cotton pads in a cooled brew or apply cold tea bags directly to your eye area.

3. Take vitamin E capsules

This important nutrient found in foods like nuts and sweet potatoes isn’t just essential for eye health when absorbed through food — it’s also a powerful under-eye protector when applied topically.

“It’s especially amazing and universal!” Renee says. “It’s a strong antioxidant that has hydrating and anti-aging properties as well as promotes healing by aiding in cell regeneration.”

Research has shown topical application of the antioxidant (found in oil or capsule form) can protect against photo aging and minimize inflammation.

4. Mix in some vitamin K

One of the most widely hailed natural dark circle fighters known to researchers is this fat soluble vitamin that’s been shown to be an effective hyperpigmentation fighter when used in conjunction with retinol (vitamin A).

“It’s amazing when added to an under-eye cream or serum because it has blood clotting and healing properties [and can] help reduce the appearance of wrinkles over time,” Renee says. “Dark circle warrior!”

While the ingredient is now widely found in over-the-counter beauty products, it’s naturally derived from foods like broccoli and Brussels sprouts.

In addition to incorporating more of those power greens into your diet, you may want to try mixing a store-bought formulation with coffee — a 2015 study found that applying caffeine pads containing vitamin K showed significant improvements in dark circles.

5. Soothe with coconut oil

Though it won’t combat circles, coconut oil has been touted as a solution for fine lines and dry under-eye skin.

This common kitchen staple has been called a “superfood” for its nutritional properties, but its high concentration of small-chain fatty acids also makes it an inflammation-reducing beauty salve that can be carefully applied to your under eyes for extra moisture.

6. Lock moisture in with olive oil

Because this common cooking ingredient is rich in fat-soluble vitamins (including E and K, described above), it may be good for at-home under-eye hydration.

There’s no solid research to back up its effectiveness on dark circles and wrinkles, but dabbing a bit on damp skin may help lock in moisture.

7. Depuff with aloe vera

If you happen to have an aloe vera plant at home, you might try applying some of the juicy leaves’ contents to dry skin (including the delicate parts underneath your eyes).

Research has shown the plant is full of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and fatty acids, and has anti-inflammatory properties that could help with puffiness.

8. Massage with arnica oil

If the bluish tint under your eyes is due to dilated blood vessels, a dab of arnica may help. The topical oil formulation of the herb has been shown to improve the appearance of bruises and other skin maladies.