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blue j seeds

This FeederWatch cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.

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Blue Jay Steals Peanuts From a (Seed) Squirrel – Nov. 29, 2016

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Watch as this Blue Jay literally steals the peanuts out from under the seed critters nose on the Cornell Lab FeederWatch Cam. After dropping one of the peanuts, it returns shorty to finish the job.

Watch LIVE at http://AllAboutBirds.org/CornellFeeders for news, updates, and more information about the pond and its surroundings.

This FeederWatch cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.

The Wild Birds Unlimited store at Sapsucker Woods has been a part of the visitor experience in the Cornell Lab’s Visitor Center ever since the new building opened in 2003. They are the preferred vendor of official Cornell Lab merchandise and offer a dizzying number of feeders, binoculars, and birdwatching-related gear and gifts to make any bird enthusiast happy. WBU has also pledged support for many of the Cornell Lab’s local efforts, including providing the bird feeders and food for this FeederWatch Cam.
#birdcams #live #birdfeeder #birds #wildlife #nature #nowplaying #newyork

Barbara, glad you enjoyed this info about jays.

The Zen Birdfeeder

The Zen Birdfeeder focuses on the birds and other nature we find in our own yards and the zen principles of ATTENTION, ACCEPTANCE, and RESPONSIBILITY.

April 12, 2012

FAQ – Why Do Blue Jays Stuff Their Mouths with Seed?

Q. Blue Jays are stuffing themselves with seed!! They take seed after seed after seed, not even stopping to open the seeds! What are they doing with all that seed?

A. When jays take numerous seeds without stopping to open them, they are placing food in their crop, which is an expandable pouch in their esophagus that temporarily holds food. This allows them to transport large amounts of food to a place to be stored for future use.

In one study, a Blue Jay was observed packing over 100 sunflower seeds in its crop during just one visit to a feeder! Check out the bulge in this jay’s throat – it’s chock full of birdseed!

Not all birds have a crop like the jay’s. Blue Jays are one of the birds that store, or cache, food for future use. According to The Sibley Guide to Bird Life & Behavior, “Birds that cache food use distinctive rocks, logs, and other habitat features as cues to the locations of their buried food. Memory of these cues allows the bird to return and dig up most of the caches.”

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They empty my feeder in no time! My other birds don’t even have a chance! Have filled it twice today due to them and it’s only noon! Very pretty but scare all other birds away and are pigs. Can’t even shot them they fly far away as soon as they even see a shadow.

Margaret, thanks much! We have to spread the word that Blue Jays are not just big piggy bullies.

Blue jays have always been a favorite bird for me. Thany you for helping prove that Blue Jays are not just gulping as much food as possible,but storing it for later. I have seen Chick a dees hiding seed under ridges in bark on the trees for later use also.

Brien, pretty amazing! You’re very patient to take that count – thanks for reporting in!

Counted one jay putting 59 small sunflower seeds into crop today.

Barbara, glad you enjoyed this info about jays.

Love this photo – and also have to laugh at those noisy bossy jays – they do stuff themselves and I watch them using holes the woodpeckers have created in the weeping birch to hide seed, then fly back for more. funny birds, but fascinating tidbit of natural lore. Thanks Nancy